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Sep 24, 2008

The HypnoBirthing Experience?

HypnoBirthing® is as much a philosophy of birth as it is a technique for achieving a satisfying, relaxing, and stress-free method of birthing. This amazing program teaches you, along with your birthing companion, the art and joy of experiencing birth in a more comfortable manner. You will learn how to call upon your body’s own natural relaxant and thus lessen, or even eliminate discomfort and the need for medication. When a woman is properly prepared for childbirth and when mind and body are in harmony, Nature is free to function in the same well-designed manner that it does with all animal mothers in Nature.

You will be fascinated as you view HypnoBirthing® films, showing labouring mothers, awake, alert and in good humour as they experience the kind of gentle birth that you, too, can know when you are free of the fear that causes pain and tension. Through self-hypnosis, special breathing, and visualization, HypnoBirthing® teaches you to release all prior programming about birth, how to trust your body and work with it, as well as how to free yourself of harmful emotions that lead to pain-causing fear and unyielding muscles.

You will learn the art of using your own natural birthing instincts. With HypnoBirthing®, you will not be in a trance or a sleep state. You will be aware and fully in control, but profoundly relaxed.

HypnoBirthing® Advantages
 Teaches deep levels of relaxation to eliminate the fear that causes tension and, thus, pain.

 Greatly reduces and often eliminates the need for chemical painkillers and drugs.

 Shortens the first phase of labour.

 Leaves mother alert, fresh, awake and with energy.

 Helps keep oxygen supplied to baby during birthing.

 Reduces the need for an episiotomy

 Reduces and often eliminates fatigue during labour.

 Empowers parents with techniques to achieve a gentle, calm birth for themselves and their baby.

 Gives the birthing companion an integral role in the birthing.

 Embraces the concept of pre-birth parenting.

 Teaches breathing techniques that allow a woman to gently breathe her baby into the world without the violence of hard, physical pushing.

This unique prenatal series is being offered at:

Becoming Maternity April 26th-May 31st (with a 2 week break between May 11th and May18th for Mother's Day and Victoria Day). Couples can register with Becoming.

The JCC with Baby and Me Fitness (couples can register with B & M Fit) April 22nd-May 20th.

Please contact Amanda Burke for more details:

Sep 22, 2008

Free Pregnancy Massage Therapy!

Posted on behalf of Trimesters: Massage Therapy Education & The Canadian College of Massage & Hydrotherapy:

Greetings to you all and happy fall!

Trimesters: Massage Therapy Education & The Canadian College of Massage & Hydrotherapy


Sunday, Sept. 21st, 2008
1.30 - 3.00 p.m.
Location: Canadian College of Massage & Hydrotherapy (Finch West and Dufferin)

This program is part of a supervised clinical training program for Massage Therapists in professional practice & Massage Therapy Students in their final year of training.

Interested women who are 14 - 42 weeks pregnant can contact the Canadian College of Massage & Hydrotherapy (C.C.M.H.) at 416-736-4576 ext. 4 to register or for more information.

The moon goddess yoga series – I’m not psycho. I’m cyclical. Period.

The moon goddess yoga series – I’m not psycho. I’m cyclical. Period.

The objective of the course is to learn how your cycle can actually be an asset in your life rather than a liability!

The moon goddess series is also a great way to prepare your mind, body and spirit for any
female reproductive milestone: whether pregnancy or menopause. Yoga goddess’ Zahra Haji shows you how to gain freedom from cyclical distress such as pms,menstrual discomfort, mood swings and infertility by optimizing the energy of your cycle throughout the month.

Join the 8-week series at Red Tent Sisters (810 Danforth, East of Pape) and learn how you can
use your cycle to improve your life.

Remember, you’re not psycho. You’re cyclical. Period.

Contact, Zahra Haji at to register.

The begins Tuesday September 23rd from 8pm – 9:30pm. The last class is November 11th.

Promotion: Save $20 when you register with a
friend. Regular price: $179. Includes how to
chart your cycle with the moon dial, weekly
email support, class discussions and a take home yoga & meditation practice.

Sep 11, 2008

The Baby Blues

What are baby blues?

Your baby's birth has set into motion great changes in your body and in your life, and your emotions are reacting in a normal way. Dramatic hormonal shifts occur when a body goes from pregnant to not pregnant in a manner of minutes. Add to this your new title (Mommy!) and the responsibilities that go with it, and your blues are perfectly understandable. You're not alone; this emotional letdown during the first few weeks is common after birth. Just remember that your state of mind has a physical origin and is exacerbated by challenging circumstances and you and your body will adjust to both soon.

How do I know if I have the baby blues?

Every woman who experiences the baby blues (also called postpartum blues) does so in a different way. The most common symptoms include:

  • Anxiety and nervousness
  • Sadness or feelings of loss
  • Stress and tension
  • Impatience or a short temper
  • Bouts of crying or tearfulness
  • Mood swings
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Trouble sleeping or excessive tiredness
  • Not wanting to get dressed, go out, or clean up the house

Could it be more than just the baby blues?

If you're not sure whether you have the blues ask your doctor or midwife, and don't feel embarrassed: This is a question that health care providers hear often and with good reason. If you're feeling these symptoms to a degree that disrupts your normal level of function. If your baby is more than a few weeks old, or if you have additional symptoms. Particularly feelings of resentment or rejection toward your baby or even a temptation to harm him you may have more than the blues, you may have postpartum depression. This is a serious illness that requires immediate treatment. Please call a doctor or professional today. If you can't make the call, then please talk to your partner, your mother or father, a sibling or friend and ask them to arrange for help. Do this for yourself and for your baby. If you can't talk about it, hand this page it to someone close to you. You do not have to feel this way, and safe treatment is available, even if you're breast-feeding.

How can I get rid of the blues?

While typical baby blues are fairly brief and usually disappear on their own, you can do a few things to help yourself feel better and get through the next few emotional days or weeks.

Give yourself time. Grant yourself permission to take the time you need to become a mother. Pregnancy lasts nine months, the adoption process can take even longer, and your baby's actual birth is only a moment, but becoming a mother takes time. Motherhood is an immense responsibility. In my opinion, it is the most overwhelming, meaningful, incredible, transforming experience of a lifetime. No wonder it produces such emotional and physical change!

No other event of this magnitude would ever be taken lightly, so don't feel guilty for treating this time in your life as the very big deal it is. Remind yourself that it's okay (and necessary) to focus on this new aspect of your life and make it your number-one priority. Tending to a newborn properly takes time. So, instead of feeling guilty or conflicted about your new focus, put your heart into getting to know this new little person. The world can wait for a few weeks.

Consider as objectively as you can just what you have accomplished. You have formed a new, entire person inside your own body and brought him forth; you have been party to a miracle. Or, if you've adopted,you've chosen to invite a miracle into your life and became an instant mother. You deserve a break and some space in which to just exist with your amazing little one, unfettered by outside concerns.

Talk to someone who understands. Talk to a sibling, relative or friend with young children about what you are feeling. Someone who has experienced the baby blues can help you realize that they are temporary, and everything will be fine. A confidante can also serve as a checkpoint who can encourage you to seek help if he or she perceives that you need it.

Reach out and get out. Simply getting out (if you are physically able and okayed for this by your health care provider) and connecting with people at large can go a long way toward reorienting your perspective. Four walls can close in very quickly, so change the scenery and head to the mall, the park, the library, a coffeehouse; whatever place you enjoy. You will feel a sense of pride as strangers ooh and ahh over your little one, and your baby will enjoy the stimulation too.

Join a support group. Joining a support group, either in person or online, can help you sort through your feelings about new motherhood. Take care to choose a group that aligns with your core beliefs about parenting a baby. As an example, if you are committed to breastfeeding, but most other members of the group are bottlefeeding, this may not be the best place for you, since your breastfeeding issues won't be understood and you won't find many helpful ideas among this group. If you have multiples, a premature baby, or a baby with special needs, for example, seek out a group for parents with babies like yours. And within those parameters, look for a group with your same overall parenting beliefs. Just because you all have twin babies doesn't mean you will all choose to parent them in the same way, so try to find like-minded new friends.

Tell Daddy what he can do to help. It's very important that your spouse or partner be there for you right now. He may want to help you, but he may be unsure of how. Here are a few things that he can do for you show him this list to help him help you.

  • Understand. It's critical that your spouse or partner feel that you understand that she is going through a hormonally driven depression that she cannot control and that she is not just being grumpy. Tell her you know this is normal, and that she'll be feeling better soon. Simply looking over this list and using some of the ideas will tell her a lot about your commitment to (and belief in) her.
  • Let her talk about her feelings. Knowing she can talk to you about her feelings without being judged or criticized will help her feel much better.
  • Tend to the baby. Taking care of your baby so Mommy can sleep or take a shower can give her a breath of fresh air. Have her nurse the baby and then you can take him for a walk (using a sling will keep Baby happy) or go on an outing. A benefit for you is that most babies love to be out and about and will enjoy this special time with you.
  • Step in to protect her. If she's overwhelmed with visitors, kindly explain to company that she needs a lot of rest. Help her with whatever household duties usually fall to her (or get someone to help her) and do what you can to stay on top of yours. Worry about the house's cleanliness or laundry upkeep will do her no good whatsoever. If relatives offer to take the baby for a few hours, or to help with the house, take them up on it.
  • Tell her she's beautiful. Most woman feel depressed about the way they look after childbirth, because most still look four months pregnant! After changing so greatly to accommodate a baby's development, a woman's body takes months to regain any semblance of normalcy. Be patient with both her body and her feelings about it. Tell her what an amazing thing she's accomplished. Any compliments that acknowledge her unique beauty are sure to be greatly appreciated!
  • Tell her you love the baby. Don't be bashful about gushing over the baby. Mommy loves to hear that you're enraptured with this new little member of your family.
  • Be affectionate, but be patient about sex. With all that she's struggling with physically and emotionally, weeks may pass before she's ready for sex (even if she's had an OK after her checkup.) That doesn't mean she doesn't love you or need you, she just needs a little time to get back to the physical aspects of your sexual relationship.
  • Tell her you love her. Even when she isn't feeling down, she needs to hear this and right now it's more important for her health and well-being than ever.
  • Get support for you, too. Becoming a father is a giant step in your life. Open up to a friend about how it feels to be a Dad, and do things that you enjoy, too. Taking care of yourself will help you take care of your new family.

Accept help from others. Family and friends are often happy to help if you just ask. When people say, Let me know if I can do anything? they usually mean it. So, go ahead and ask kindly for what you want, whether it's watching your baby so that you can nap, taking your older child to the park, helping you make a meal, or doing some laundry.

Get some sleep. Right now, sleeplessness will enhance your feelings of depression. So, take every opportunity to get some shuteye. Nap when the baby sleeps, go to bed early, and sleep in later in the morning if you can. If you are co-sleeping, take advantage of this special time when you don't have to get up out of bed to tend to your baby. And if your baby's sleep patterns are distressing to you then reach out to an experienced parent for help, or check out my book The No-Cry Sleep Solution: Gentle Ways to Help Your Baby Sleep Through the Night.

Don't fret about perfection right now. Household duties are not your top priority now. In fact, nothing aside from getting to know your baby is. Remember that people are coming to see your baby, not your house, so enjoy sharing your baby with visitors without worrying about a little clutter or dust. Simplify, prioritize, and delegate routine tasks, errands, and obligations.

Enjoy your job. If you work outside the home, then view your time at your job as an opportunity to refresh and prepare yourself to enjoy your baby fully when you are at home. Go ahead, talk about your baby and share pictures with your co-workers. Chances are, they'll love to hear about your new little one. This is a nice and appropriate way of indulging your natural instincts to focus on your baby when you can?t be with her.

Get into exercising. With your health care provider's approval, start exercising with short walks or swims. Exercise will help you feel better in many ways both physical and emotional. Even if you didn't exercise before you had your baby, this is a great time to start. Studies prove that regular exercise helps combat depression, and it will help you regain your pre-baby body much more quickly.

Eat healthful foods. When the body isn't properly nourished, spirits can flag, particularly when the stress of recovery makes more nutritional demands. If you are breastfeeding, a nourishing diet is important for both you and your baby. Healthful foods, eaten in frequent meals, can provide the nutrition you need to combat the baby blues and give you the energy you need to handle your new role. And don't forget to drink water and other healthy fluids, especially if you're nursing! Dehydration can cause fatigue and headaches.

Take care of yourself. Parenting a new baby is an enormous responsibility, but things will fall into place for you and everything will seem easier given time. During this adjustment phase, try to do a few things for yourself. Simple joys like reading a book, painting your nails, going out to lunch with a friend or other ways in which you nourish your spirit can help you feel happier.

Love yourself. You are amazing: You've become mother to a beautiful new baby. You've played a starring role in the production of an incredible miracle. Be proud of what you've accomplished, and take the time to know and enjoy the strong, capable, multifaceted person you are becoming.

This article is a copyrighted excerpt from Gentle Baby Care by Elizabeth Pantley.

How to Have a Happy Marriage When You're Busy Being Parents

Is your marriage everything you ever hoped it could be? Or has it been pushed down your list of priorities since having children? Let's face it, parenthood is a full-time job, and it dramatically changes your marriage relationship. But marriage is the foundation upon which your entire family is structured. If your marriage is strong, your whole family will be strong; your life will be more peaceful, you'll be a better parent, and you'll, quite simply, have more fun in your life.

Make a commitment?

To create or maintain a strong marriage you will have to take the first critical step: You must be willing to put time, effort and thought into nurturing your marriage. The ideas that follow will help you follow through on this commitment and will put new life and meaning into your marriage. A wonderful thing may happen. You may fall in love with your spouse all over again. In addition, your children will greatly benefit from your stronger relationship. Children feel secure when they know that Mom and Dad love each other. Particularly in today's world, where 50 percent of marriages end in divorce; half of your children's friends have gone, or are going through a divorce; or maybe it's your kids who have survived a divorce and are now living in a new family arrangement. Your children need daily proof that their family life is stable and predictable. When you make a commitment to your marriage, your children will feel the difference. No, they won't suffer from neglect! They'll blossom when your marriage and their home-life is thriving.

The surprising secret is that this doesn't have to take any extra time in your already busy schedule. Just a change in attitude plus a committed focus can yield a stronger, happier marriage.

So here's my challenge to you. Read the following suggestions and apply them in your marriage for the next 30 days. Then evaluate your marriage. I guarantee you'll both be happier.

Look for the good, overlook the bad

You married this person for many good reasons. Your partner has many wonderful qualities. Your first step in adding sizzle to your marriage is to look for the good and overlook the bad.

Make it a habit to ignore the little annoying things dirty socks on the floor, a day-old coffee cup on the counter, worn out flannel pajamas, an inelegant burp at the dinner table and choose instead to search for those things that make you smile: the way he rolls on the floor with the baby; the fact that she made your favorite cookies, the peace in knowing someone so well that you can wear your worn out flannels or burp at the table.

Give two compliments every day

Now that you've committed to seeing the good in your partner, it's time to say it! This is a golden key to your mate's heart. Our world is so full of negative input, and we so rarely get compliments from other people. When we do get a compliment, it not only makes us feel great about ourselves, it actually makes us feel great about the person giving the compliment! Think about it! When your honey says, You're the best. I'm so glad I married you. It not only makes you feel loved, it makes you feel more loving.

Compliments are easy to give, take such a little bit of time, and they're free. Compliments are powerful; you just have to make the effort to say them. Anything works: Dinner was great, you make my favorite sauce.Thanks for picking up the cleaning. It was very thoughtful, you saved me a trip. That sweater looks great on you.

Play nice

That may sound funny to you, but think about it. How many times do you see -- or experience -- partners treating each other in impolite, harsh ways that they'd never even treat a friend. Sometimes we take our partners for granted and unintentionally display rudeness. As the saying goes, if you have a choice between being right and being nice, just choose to be nice. Or to put this in the wise words of Bambi's friend Thumper, the bunny rabbit, If you can't say something nice don't say nothing at all.

Pick your battles

How often have you heard this advice about parenting? This is great advice for child-rearing and it's great advice to follow in your marriage as well. In any human relationship there will be disagreement and conflict. The key here is to decide which issues are worth pursuing and which are better off ignored. By doing this, you'll find much less negative energy between you.

From now on, anytime you feel annoyed, take a minute to examine the issue at hand, and ask yourself a few questions. How important is this? Is this worth picking a fight over? What would be the benefit of choosing this battle versus letting it go?

The 60 second cuddle

You can often identify a newly married couple just by how much they touch each other, holding hands, sitting close, touching arms, kissing; just as you can spot an oldly-married couple, by how little they touch. Mothers, in particular, often have less need for physical contact with their partners because their babies and young children provide so much opportunity for touch and cuddling that day's end finds them touched fulfilled.

So here's a simple reminder: make the effort to touch your spouse more often. A pat, a hug, a kiss, a shoulder massage, the good feeling it produces for both of you far outweighs the effort.

Here's the deal: Whenever you've been apart make it a rule that you will take just 60 seconds to cuddle, touch and connect. This can be addictive! If you follow this advice soon you'll find yourselves touching each other more often, and increasing the romantic aspect of your relationship.

Spend more time talking to and listening to your partner.

I don't mean, Remember to pick up Jimmy's soccer uniform. Or, I have a PTA meeting tonight. Rather, get into the habit of sharing your thoughts about what you read in the paper, what you watch on TV, your hopes, your dreams, your concerns. Take a special interest in those things that your spouse is interested in and ask questions. And then listen to the answers.

Spend time with your spouse

It can be very difficult for your marriage to thrive if you spend all your time being Mommy and Daddy. You need to spend regular time as Husband and Wife. This doesn't mean you have to take a two-week vacation in Hawaii. (Although that might be nice, too!) Just take small daily snippets of time when you can enjoy uninterrupted conversation, or even just quiet companionship, without a baby on your hip, a child tugging your shirtsleeve or a teenager begging for the car keys. A daily morning walk around the block or a shared cup of tea after all the children are in bed might work wonders to re-connect you to each other. And yes, it?s quite fine to talk about your children when you're spending your time together, because, after all, your children are one of the most important connections you have in your relationship.

When you and your spouse regularly connect in a way that nurtures your relationship, you may find a renewed love between you, as well as a refreshed vigor that will allow you to be a better, more loving parent. You owe it to yourself and to your kids to nurture your relationship.

So take my challenge and use these ideas for the next 30 days. And watch your marriage take on a whole new glow.

Parts of this article are excerpted with permission from books by Elizabeth Pantley:

Kid Cooperation: How to Stop Yelling, Nagging and Pleading Hidden Messages: What Our Words and Actions are Really Telling Our Children

Stop the Diaper Changing Battles

Babies are little bundles of energy! They don't want to lie still to have their diapers changed. They cry, fuss, or even crawl away. A simple issue can turn into a major tug-of-war between parent and baby.

Diaper changing as a ritual

The position of parent and baby during a diaper change is perfect for creating a bonding experience between you. You are leaning over your baby, and your face is at the perfect arms-length distance for engaging eye contact and communication. What's more, this golden opportunity presents itself many times during each day; no matter how busy you both get, you have a few moments of quiet connection. It's too valuable a ritual to treat it as simply maintenance.

Learning about your baby

Diapering offers a perfect opportunity for you to truly absorb your baby's cues and signals. You'll learn how his little body works, what tickles him, what causes those tiny goose bumps. As you lift, move, and touch your baby, your hands will learn the map of his body and what's normal for him. This is important because it will enable you to easily decipher any physical changes that need attention.

Developing trust

Regular diaper changes create rhythm in your baby's world and afford the sense that the world is safe and dependable. They are regular and consistent episodes in days that may not always be predictable. Your loving touches teach your baby that he is valued, and your gentle care teaches him that he is respected.

A learning experience for your baby

Your baby does a lot of learning during diaper changes. It's one of the few times that she actually sees her own body without clothes, when she can feel her complete movements without a wad of diaper between her legs. Diaper-off time is a great chance for her to stretch her limbs and learn how they move.

During changing time, your baby is also a captive audience to your voice, so she can focus on what you are saying and how you are saying it, an important component of her language learning process. Likewise, for a precious few minutes, you are her captive audience, so you can focus on what she's saying and how she is saying it; crucial to the growth of your relationship.

What your baby thinks and feels

Many active babies could not care less if their diapers are clean. They're too busy to concern themselves with such trivial issues. It may be important to you, but it's not a priority for your child.

Diaper rash or uncomfortable diapers (wrong size or bad fit) can make him dread diaper changes, so check these first. Once you're sure all the practical issues are covered, make a few adjustments in this unavoidable process to make it more enjoyable.

Take a deep breath

Given the number of diapers you have to change, it's possible that what used to be a pleasant experience for you has gotten to be routine, or even worse, a hassle. When parents approach diaper changing in a brisk, no-nonsense way, it isn't any fun for Baby. Try to reconnect with the bonding experience that diaper changing can be -- a moment of calm in a busy day when you share one-on-one time with your baby.

Have some fun

This is a great time to sing songs, blow tummy raspberries, or do some tickle and play. A little fun might take the dread out of diaper changes for both of you. A game that stays fresh for a long time is, hide the diaper. Put a new diaper on your head, on your shoulder, or tucked in your shirt and ask, Where's the diaper? I can't find it! A fun twist is to give the diaper a name and a silly voice, and use it as a puppet. Let the diaper call your child to the changing station and have it talk to him as you change it. (If you get tired of making Mister Diaper talk, just remember what it was like before you tried the idea.)

Use distraction

Keep a flashlight with your changing supplies and let your baby play with it while you change him. Some kids? flashlights have a button to change the color of the light, or shape of the ray. Call this his diaper flashlight and put it away when the change is complete. You may find a different type of special toy that appeals to your little one, or even a basket of small interesting toys. If you reserve these only for diaper time, they can retain their novelty for a long time.

Try a stand-up diaper

If your baby's diaper is just wet (not messy), try letting her stand up while you do a quick change. If you're using cloth diapers, have one leg pre-pinned so that you can slide it on like pants, or opt for pre-fitted diapers that don't require pins.

Time to potty train

If your child is old enough and seems ready for the next step, consider potty training.

This article is an excerpt from Gentle Baby Care by Elizabeth Pantley. (McGraw-Hill, 2003)

The Other Side of the Glass

This film is about the powerlessness and trauma that fathers experience when they can't protect their partners and babies from the violation and abuse that some face during a hospital birth.

Thank you Janel for sharing this film.

View film

Sep 10, 2008

The Golden Notebook

"You are in the process of being indoctrinated. We have not yet evolved a system of education that is not a system of indoctrination. We are sorry, but it is the best we can do. What you are being taught here is an amalgam of current prejudice and the choices of this particular culture.

The slightest look at history will show how impermanent these must be. You are being taught by people who have been able to accommodate themselves to a regime of thought laid down by their predecessors.

It is a self-perpetuating system. Those of you who are more robust and individual than others, will be encouraged to leave and find ways of educating yourself-educating your own judgement. Those that stay must remember, always and all the time, that they are being moulded and patterned to fit into the narrow and particular needs of this society."

-- Doris Lessing, "The Golden Notebook"

Dr. Phil Soliciting Home Birth Horror Stories

Dr. Phil's website is soliciting home-birth horror
stories-- get happy clients to inundate it with satisfied home-birthers, or
go to the site yourself and give your feedback. If we don't respond, he will
do a show that slams women's right to birth at home and our sound judgment
to make such choices..... ....

Dr. Phil has a form on his website where you can submit your "home-birth
horror story".

Many of us are instead using this form to a) tell our horrible hospital
stories, b) tell our great home-birth stories, or c) just plain let Dr. Phil
and his staff how bad we think this show concept is.

My hope is that, if enough people raise a stink, the show will drop the
idea. If you or anyone you know wants to join in the barrage, you
can find the form here:

Do you regret having a home birth?
http://www.drphil. com/plugger/ respond/? plugID=12524

Pregnant? Wondering If You Should Home Birth?
http://www.drphil. com/plugger/ respond/? plugID=12479

Did You Have A Traumatic Birthing Experience?
http://www.drphil. com/plugger/ respond/? plugID=12538

Sep 9, 2008

Bill C-51

This is a Bill that will wreak havoc on every type of holistic, homeopathic, natural, energetic, and non government sanctioned method of care, illness prevention, or cures.

This bill is a flagrant misuse and abuse from the governmental super-structure. Many of you with small business's that have spent your lives dedicated to these natural home remedies, will be not allowed to practice the methods that have been passed along for generations.

Interestingly-the government has given you tax breaks, and offers programs to open small business's in this field- yet now they are destroying the field itself. Over the last 3 years-some hospitals have opened up mindfulness clinics and have even used non-evasive homeopathic remedies as cures. Hypocrisy at its finest.

Learn more

Sep 8, 2008

The Midwife On A Mission

CBC Evening News: Can A Simple, Caring Approach Reverse The High U.S Infant Mortality Rate?

An 81 year-old grandmother runs one of the most successful birthing clinics in the nation in the city with the worst infant mortality rate.

Sep 4, 2008

With Child

Let us be your guide and resource to the wonderful and exciting world of parenthood! On our site we feature the most popular and helpful products used by our customers. We hope that this will save you time and help answer some of your questions. However, for those times - and there are many- when you aren't sure of what you need, where to go or what to do, just give us a call. We are here for you!

Bassinet Recall

Two Infants Die Due to Strangulation While Using Simplicity Close Sleeper Bassinets

Back to school

Tips for Students, Parents and Teachers.
Get the house, the classroom and the kids ready for the new school year with shopping tips, recipe ideas, homework help and much more!